A plastic waste dump in Jenjarom, Malaysia.

A plastic waste dump in Jenjarom, Malaysia.

Fish migrate from warmer waters.

Fish migrate from warmer waters.

Maui’s Ark founder, Stephen Harris, at the United Nations Environment Programme headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, at the time he attended the first Sustainable Blue Economy Conference, from 26-28 November.

Maui’s Ark founder, Stephen Harris, at the United Nations Environment Programme headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, at the time he attended the first Sustainable Blue Economy Conference, from 26-28 November.

news

Bags gagged! Throwaway plastic bags became outlaws in New Zealand on 1 July.

Sign on a Wellington beachfront park. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said, when launching the public consultation process that has led to the ban, that she received more letters expressing concern about throwaway plastic bags than about any other issue, and most of these letters were from children.

Sign on a Wellington beachfront park. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said, when launching the public consultation process that has led to the ban, that she received more letters expressing concern about throwaway plastic bags than about any other issue, and most of these letters were from children.

For the official word on the ban, and other related developments, see the Facebook page of the Ministry for the Environment here:

https://www.facebook.com/ministryfortheenvironment/

South East Asian countries have signed a pledge to tackle marine plastic pollution. Leaders of the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) - which includes four of the world's top polluters - adopted the Bangkok Declaration on Combating Marine Debris in ASEAN Region on 22 June. See full story:

https://news.abs-cbn.com/spotlight/06/22/19/southeast-asian-nations-vow-to-combat-plastic-debris-in-oceans

In one of the biggest steps to take responsibility for the rubbish we produce, almost all countries have agreed to extend the ban on shipping hazardous waste so that plastics can no longer be sent from rich countries to dumping grounds in the developing world. The extension to the Basel Convention, signed in Geneva in early May by 187 countries but not the US, prohibits them from exporting plastic waste to another country without its consent. See full story in The Guardian:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/may/10/nearly-all-the-worlds-countries-sign-plastic-waste-deal-except-us

The ocean is warming at an ever-faster rate, a leading global weather watchdog says. In its annual State of the Global Climate report, published late March, the World Meteorological Organisation says the four years 2015-18 were the warmest on record, and oceans are a key indicator, absorbing nine-tenths of all heat trapped by greenhouse gases. The Southern Ocean has warmed the fastest, and an area of the Tasman Sea west of New Zealand’s South Island recorded 5 degrees Celsius above average - a world record. These trends have grave implications for life on Earth. See full report:

https://gallery.mailchimp.com/daf3c1527c528609c379f3c08/files/82234023-0318-408a-9905-5f84bbb04eee/Climate_Statement_2018.pdf

Meanwhile, the Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) warns that overall CO2 emissions from the plastic life cycle are expected to increase by 50% by 2030, while the CO2 increase from plastic incineration is set to triple by then, due to wrong waste management choices. See full report:

http://wwf.panda.org/?uNewsID=344071

Depleted oceans could threaten the future of our planet, the President of the Seychelles has warned in a speech delivered underwater. See full story from the BBC:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-47925193

A whale beached in the Philippines was found to have eaten around 40kg of plastic, including 16 rice sacks, four banana plantation style bags and multiple shopping bags. See full story:

http://www.climateaction.org/news/dead-whale-found-with-40kg-of-plastic-in-its-stomach

Nearly three-quarters of New Zealanders are concerned about plastic waste, a major study shows. The Colmar Brunton annual ‘Better Futures’ study revealed that 72% of respondents rated plastic waste as a significant concern, more than any other issue. The survey, which polled 1000 people online in early December, showed 9% more people concerned about plastic waste than a year earlier. The result was ahead of the cost of living (68%), protection of children and suicide rates (both 67%) and other environmental issues, notably polluted lakes, rivers and seas (64%) and climate change (55%). See full results here:

https://www.colmarbrunton.co.nz/news/better-futures-report/

Disposable plastic bags will be banned in New Zealand from next July. Following public consultation the New Zealand Government has decided to ban single-use plastic bags from July this year. See summary of submissions:

www.mfe.govt.nz/plasticbags.

We’re eating plastic, says a study reported in the New York Times. The research, led by a medical university in Vienna, found an alarming prevalence and range of microplastics in samples taken from human gut contents. See report:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/22/health/microplastics-human-stool.html?&moduleDetail=section-news-2&action=click&contentCollection=Health&region=Footer&module=MoreInSection&version=WhatsNext&contentID=WhatsNext&pgtype=Blogs

The NZ Parliament’s Environment Committee has heard from Maui’s Ark founder, Stephen Harris, about the scale and complexity of marine plastic debris. The Committee is holding an inquiry into coastal plastic pollution in New Zealand - but Harris says the problem is a global one:

https://www.radionz.co.nz/audio/player?audio_id=2018662434

https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/the-house/audio/2018662434/plastic-not-so-fantastic

https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/366379/plastic-in-nz-waters-we-can-only-control-a-segment-of-it










Maui's Ark founder Stephen Harris (see photo at left) began a new role in September as Special Representative of the Commonwealth Clean Oceans Alliance. The role leads efforts across the 53-member Commonwealth to tackle the causes and consequences of plastic pollution in the ocean, with a particular focus on the Pacific and small island developing states. As of January 2019 24 Commonwealth countries had joined CCOA, including Pacific Island countries Vanuatu, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, Nauru, Australia and New Zealand. Hear about his mission in this 30 January 2019 interview with Don Wiseman, of Radio New Zealand’s Dateline Pacific programme:

https://www.radionz.co.nz/audio/player?audio_id=2018680398

Beware of greenwash! New Zealand's Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment has investigated the sometimes-loose use of terms claiming packaging is 'biodegradable' or 'compostable'. Here's the Commissioner's guide to sort the green stuff from the brown stuff:

https://www.pce.parliament.nz/publications/biodegradable-and-compostable-plastics-in-the-environment

Somalia's Islamist movement, al-Shabab, has decreed a ban on single-use plastic bags. Al-Shabab - which means 'The Youth' in Arabic - says they are dangerous to human and animal health. The penalties for non-compliance have not been spelled out.

Britain is contributing nearly $17 million (9 million pounds) to spearhead a Commonwealth drive to protect marine environments in small island states. The initiative recognises the connection between climate change and marine vulnerability:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/foreign-secretary-announces-9m-to-save-our-oceans

A bug that eats plastic could offer a solution to attacking much of the world's plastic waste build-up, scientists say. The enzyme is able to break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET) - a form of plastic used in millions of tonnes of plastic bottles:https://www.stuff.co.nz/science/103194694/scientists-accidentally-create-plasticeating-enzyme-that-could-help-fight-pollution

Cambodia's coastal town of Sihanouk is suffocating under drifts of plastic waste, the UK Guardian newspaper reports. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/25/mountains-and-mountains-of-plastic-life-on-cambodias-polluted-coast











Not in my back yard? Plastic waste on the Cambodian coast at Sihanoukville.

Not in my back yard? Plastic waste on the Cambodian coast at Sihanoukville.

New Zealand's Foreign Minister, Winston Peters, has pledged his country's support to helping Pacific nations address the problems of plastic waste. New Zealand's government recently joined the UN-led CleanSeas campaign which aims to rid the seas of plastic waste. 

Henderson Island. Photo by Jennifer Lavers

Henderson Island. Photo by Jennifer Lavers

New Zealand's most successful global politician and its most famous actor have backed calls to ban single-use plastic bags. Helen Clark - a former New Zealand Prime Minister and until last year head of the United Nations development programme - plus actor Sam Neill have both recently added their voices to calls to ban the bag, as has primate researcher Jane Goodall: https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/101773516/helen-clark-joins-sam-neill-and-jane-goodall-in-campaign-urging-nationwide-ban-on-plastic-bags

A New Zealand company has developed the world's first solution for converting all grades of plastic waste into valuable building materials. See more on this TV3 News item:

http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/money/2018/01/could-this-be-the-answer-to-plastic-waste.html